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Road Trip to Amish Country

July 26, 2010

Today we went on another road trip just over the Tennessee state line to Ethridge, to visit some of the Amish farms that are selling their wares at the peak of their summer harvest. It’s just a little less than an hour’s drive from our house, and this is our second time to go. Last week we bought a bushel of green beans, a quarter bushel of purple hull peas, a dozen ears of sweet corn, 8 pounds of beets, and about 15 pounds of little white potatoes. The way it works is that you get a map from the local town that shows the roads where produce and farm products are being offered for sale. Then you drive the roads and look for painted white signs showing what’s available at each farm.

Today we bought blackberries, butternut squash, some pear honey, fresh baked bread, and some cheese.

Though some Amish people object to being photographed because of their religious beliefs, I did shoot some pictures of the countryside and farms. To me the area is breathtakingly beautiful and inspiring.

Here are some of the pictures I took from the car along our route.

(That’s one of the farmers’ signs in the foreground.)

Storm clouds are rolling in.

The Amish travel by horse and carriage, and these are a familiar sight even on the four-lane highways.

We stopped in town for a nice home-cooked meal at a country diner and headed home about mid-afternoon.  It was a glorious day, even though the heat index was around 104 degrees. It was cloudy and breezy, and just before heading home a cooling thunderstorm came up. I’m sad to say we didn’t get the rain at our house. What’s left of my garden is parched and will need a drink tomorrow.

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13 Comments leave one →
  1. Mary Banks permalink
    July 26, 2010 9:09 pm

    Martha, loved this descriptive and the photos are great! I know it was a most enjoyable ride . . . . . Love ya! Mary Fran

  2. July 26, 2010 11:52 pm

    Martha,

    Your photographs remind me of the Amish country near the town in Iowa where I went to university. We spent time visiting the different towns and delighting in the abundance of beautifully crafted furniture and woolens. Your drive through the country in Tennessee brought back those memories. Thank you.

    • July 27, 2010 1:50 pm

      Hannah, I will go out of my way to support local growers and crafters any day of the week. We need more of them! Aren’t they wonderful?

  3. Linda permalink
    July 27, 2010 11:25 am

    I know you loved every minute of these trips. Also, was so impressed with your little town in the woods. That’s too bad it can’t get advertised to visit. I wish I could take my grandkids there to see it. Heck, I’d like to go.

  4. July 27, 2010 1:52 pm

    Come on up here and we’ll go any time, Linda. If you google Lawrenceburg TN you can find quite a bit about these farms. There are roadside shops along Highway 43, but they’re a bit commercialized for my taste. We heard about the farms selling their wares from several friends and neighbors around here.

  5. July 27, 2010 10:11 pm

    We have an Amish community North of Newark and the drive always takes me back in time and the simplicity seems so attractive. I love the cheeses, herbs, and delicious breads and visiting a farm seems to return my soul to another time in our country’s life. I am hoping we get some rain tonight …the earth is parched. Imagine and Live in Peace, Mary Helen Fernandez Stewart

    • July 30, 2010 6:37 am

      Mary Helen, I love the simplicity of their way of life. It’s good for the soul to see that things don’t have to be so hectic and that there is another way of being.

      We did get a little shower — actually two nice ones now, thank goodness!

  6. July 28, 2010 3:57 am

    Wonderful shots!…..I have frequented the Amish markets in Lancaster, PA….wonderful quilts and handmade things and great produce.

    • July 30, 2010 6:38 am

      Cynthia, we have been through that area, though we didn’t go to Amish country. I love that part of Pennsylvania.

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